posted 2011-04-27 12:00:16

Can College Students Afford the Luxury of Sleep in this Economy?

 
Sleeping
Sleeping
Can College Students Afford the Luxury of Sleep in this Economy?

Jasmin Copeland

Contributing Writer

New York is described as the city that never sleeps, but now reports are showing that America is following the same pattern. The fast-paced energy of this vibrant city is something that is celebrated, but many experts are saying that we New Yorkers need to slow down and smell the roses. In a nutshell, these medical gurus are reporting what most of us already know — that we are overworked and overstressed.

This is something that is relevant to my life and that I definitely agree with, especially as I watched how many Hunter students looked completely exhausted by the time Spring Break arrived. This sentiment has also been reflected on the statuses of many Facebookers as college students conveyed statements like “I am so tired; I need a vacation…lol.” Although there is a “laugh out loud” component to this particular optimist’s example, this is an issue that needs to be taken seriously. Stress and exhaustion are two of the prime factors that affect a person’s health, regardless of age. It seems that this economy has definitely instilled a competitive edge within all of us, where the “survival of the fittest” theme constantly rings bells in our college heads and we are compelled to put in long, strenuous hours at school and work to reach our educational or economic goals.

However, we all know that sleep is the most essential gift that we can give our bodies, and it appears that we as college students and Americans in general are not getting enough rest. Distinctively, with this financial crisis that our country is experiencing, we surely want to work very diligently in all aspects of our lives to ensure that we not only have food on our tables and a roof over our heads, but to also attain a stabilized financial future. I constantly hear many undergrads saying, “I stayed up until 4 a.m. to do this paper,” and proclaiming that they only got one hour of sleep.

Internally, you may have just thought that this particular paradigm is just a repercussion of “typical student procrastination,” but it is not. These students, like many of us at Hunter, are extremely hard working with full time jobs and demanding personal schedules. Students are not choosing to do tasks at the brink of a deadline for the sake of a pure adrenaline rush; rather, it is because we simply have too much on our plates, and, like most human beings, we get tired after sleep deprivation has overtaken our bodies. Ultimately, the devastation of this economy has left many people jobless and made the process of living in urban areas such as New York very pricey, but, honestly, don’t we as college students, New Yorkers and Americans have the right to afford some rest?